Posts in "stormwater" tag

WSRG: Stormwater Managment In Western Sydney

This is a cross post from the EA Western Sydney Regional Group. RSVP is required and please see the PDF flyer for full details.

EEA 2-day workshop – Stormwater Management

While this is not a Panel organised event it may be of use to members on our lists.

A 2-day Workshop entitled “Stormwater Management (source control)” has been organised by EEA (Engineering Education, Australia) for Thursday/Friday 3/4 May in Sydney. The Notes provided in the course are based on content of the award-winning manual “WSUD: basic procedures for ‘source control’ of stormwater – a Handbook for Australian practice” edited by Professor John Argue (University of South Australia). This document is endorsed by Stormwater Industry Association (SIA), Australian Water Association (AWA) and by Dept of Water, Western Australia. The Notes have been regularly updated since first publication in 2004.

If you are interested please contact EEA or Professor John Argue (John.Argue@unisa.edu.au) directly. John has provided an overview flyer as well.

WSRG: Stormwater Harvesting, Reuse and Water Strategy

The Western Sydney Regional Group of EA is running a technical presentation that may be of interest to members of this list. It is titled: Stormwater Harvesting, Reuse and Water Strategy and will be given at the University of Western Sydney (Kingswood Campus), 2pm to 5pm on 30th November 2011. A map of the venue, together with full details, is available in PDF format.

There will be two speakers, namely:

  1. Mr. Geoff Douglas, Project Manager CBD Works Willoughby City Councils
  2. Dr. Bhakti Devi, Manager – Water Strategy, City of Sydney Council

Who will speak on:

(1) Chatswood Integrated Stormwater Management Scheme
Chatswood Integrated Stormwater Management Scheme was developed for a number of reasons including leading the community in water savings, reducing the impact of flooding, to provide a source of non potable water for local businesses, and in providing a possible first step in a council vision for a non-potable ring main around Chatswood. This project has major local and global significance in proving that significant potable water savings can be made by using available stormwater for office building and other business needs.

(2) City of Sydney Water Strategy
City of Sydney is currently developing a water strategy which is comprehensive in scope and scale. The strategy is therefore called Decentralised Water Master Plan. The master plan aims to identify all opportunities that exist within City of Sydney council area for improving water efficiency, improving stormwater quality and increasing the use of recycled water. Dr Devi’s presentation will provide the context and an overview of the master plan. It will also cover the baseline mapping which forms its foundation and the opportunities that can be seen emerging from it.

Stormwater Management – What Progress Have We Made?

The next Panel seminar will be on Tuesday 19th April 2011, 5:30 for a 6pm start at the EA Auditorium, Chatswood. It is a panel Q&A session:

A big leap was made in the way we manage storm water 15 years ago when industry and the public embraced a more holistic view. Storm water systems were no longer seen as just a way of conveying urban runoff in a way that minimized inconvenience for the public. The focus on storm water systems started to include water quality, softer more environmental systems, repairing the ecologically of systems that had been neglected and more recently using storm water as a resource. This seminar’s participants were at the forefront of these changes and bring their combined industry experience to look back on the progress we have made.

Panel:

  • Dr Geoff O’Loughlin, Anstad Pty Ltd
  • Dr Peter Coombes, Bonacci Water Pty Ltd
  • Dr Brett Phillips, Cardno

Drinks and nibbles will be available.

A PDF flyer is available.

WSUD and Flooding: 35th EEA Stormwater Management Workshop

A 2-day Workshop entitled “Stormwater Management (source control)” has been organised by EEA (Engineering Education, Australia) for Thursday/Friday 17/18 March, 2011 in Sydney. The Notes provided in the course are based on content of the award-winning manual “WSUD: basic procedures for ‘source control’ of stormwater – a Handbook for Australian practice” edited by Professor John Argue (University of South Australia). This document is endorsed by Stormwater Industry Association (SIA), Australian Water Association (AWA) and by Dept of Water, Western Australia. The Notes have been regularly updated since first publication in 2004

The content features a balance between the three domains of WSUD (stormwater) practice – quantity control, pollution control and stormwater harvesting. Serious issues of stormwater management in Australia are posed by the prospect of 35 million population by 2050. How will Sydney’s existing stormwater infrastructure cope with change to selected regions under the ‘high rise’ option being proposed as the likely re-development scenario? What strategies can be adopted to enable existing (competently-performing) infrastructure to cope with this scenario without expensive upgrade? How can re-development in catchments with existing under-performing stormwater infrastructure be managed to enable the in-ground works to progressively meet greater capacity demand without expensive upgrade? Must the creeks and natural waterways on Sydney’s northern, western and southern perimeters be sacrificed to hard-lining in the wake of the proposed expansion? Positive, strategic answers to these and many other questions based on WSUD ‘source control’ practices will be provided in the Workshop.

The Workshop will also include results of hydrological modelling that provides a ‘design front-end’ for use in the MUSIC model. The pollution control practice presented takes advantage of enhanced treatment available in parent soil masses. The fate of dissolved pollutants is singled out for particular attention.

The short course includes: design procedures based on state-of-the-art analyses and best overseas practices adapted to Australia-wide conditions; case study illustrations drawn from field installations with between ten and 18 years of Australian operational history; design ‘worked examples’; introduction and access to rainwater tank sizing software applicable across Australia. The Workshop will be led by Professor John Argue.

Attendance at the Workshop earns 32 hours credit for continuing professional development purposes with Engineers Australia. More information about the workshop including course content, cost and Registration Forms may be obtained from Ms Ann Ellis on (03) 9326 9777 or ann@eeaust.com.au

Presentation: Blockage of Hydraulic Structures

The next Panel presentation is scheduled for 25th May 5:30 for 6pm and refreshments will be available beforehand. The abstract of the talk is:

This presentation will discuss the ARR Project 11 concerned with blockage. Blockage is an important issue for the design and management of drainage systems, and one that can cause considerable disruption and damage. Blockage can affect bridges and culverts as well as urban stormwater systems. While urban areas are of particular importance, blockage is also a concern in rural regions. Currently available guidelines have some comment but have limited guidance. This project is aimed at improving this situation. The project is being undertaken with the assistance of a committee of experts drawn from different sectors of the industry and different regions of Australia. A workshop in 2009 set the scene and a report was prepared on the issue. The project has continued in 2010 with another workshop and guidelines agreed among the committee. The presentation will describe the process and the conclusions of the project to date.

Full details are available on a PDF Flyer.

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PRCC: Final Call For Abstracts

The final call for abstracts for the inaugural Practical Responses to Climate Change National Conference has just been made. If you are interested, please contact the organisers as soon as possible at: http://www.climatechange2010.org.

Stormwater’10 – SIA National Conference

Creating a Storm: The Future of Stormwater in Australia

Call For Abstracts

The Conference Steering Committee of STORMWATER 2010 are now inviting all stormwater practitioners to submit an Abstract for Conference Papers, particularly those that highlight lessons earned and demonstrate the successful application of those lessons. Abstracts that focus on the process involved in undertaking the project rather than the outcomes of the project will be highly regarded.

Full details are contained in the Call for Abstracts document which can be downloaded by clicking here or alternatively can be downloaded from the official conference website at www.gemsevents.com.au/stormwater2010.

In 2010 we are seeking abstracts for both “Refereed” and “Non Refereed” papers. “Refereed” papers will be subject to rigorous scientific peer review under the supervision of a formal Conference Scientific Committee in accordance with the “Higher Education Research Data Collection Specifications for the Collection of 2010 Data”. This process has been put in place by the Conference Steering Committee to attract academic papers.

Authors not associated with a research institution may prefer to submit papers that are “Non Refereed”.

It is anticipated that refereed and non refereed paper sessions will be approximately 30 minutes in length with an additional 10 minutes allocated for questions.

Based on the 2010 Conference theme, conference paper abstracts are being sought in the following streams:

  • Supporting Better Urban Outcomes – Biodiversity and Amenity
  • Protecting our Urban Waterways – Water Quality and Managing Flow Impacts
  • Managing Open Spaces – Sustainable Stormwater Harvest
  • Building our Future – Policy. Planning and Knowledge
  • Institutional Capacity Building – Improving Governance of Stormwater

To download the full Call for Abstracts document, please visit the Call for Abstracts page on the conference website at www.gemsevents.com.au/stormwater2010

For further information about STORMWATER 2010 please contact Julie McGraw at GEMS Event Management at jmcgraw@gemspl.com.au or visit the conference website.

32nd Presentation Of EEA 2-Day Stormwater Management Workshop: Sydney, 2010

A 2-day Workshop entitled “Stormwater Management (source control)” has been organised by EEA (Engineering Education, Australia) for Thursday/Friday 18/19 March, 2010 in Sydney. The Notes provided in the course are based on the content of the award-winning manual “WSUD: basic procedures for ‘source control’ of stormwater – a Handbook for Australian practice” edited by Professor John Argue (University of South Australia). This document is endorsed by Stormwater Industry Association (SIA), Australian Water Association (AWA) and, recently, by Dept of Water, Western Australia. The Notes were updated in February, 2009.

The content features a balance between the three domains of WSUD (stormwater) practice – quantity control, pollution control and stormwater harvesting. Serious issues of stormwater management in Australia are posed by the Federal Government’s goal of 35 million population by 2050. How will Sydney’s existing stormwater infrastructure cope with change to selected regions under the ‘high rise’ option being proposed as the likely re-development scenario? What strategies can be adopted to enable existing (competently-performing) infrastructure to cope with this scenario without expensive upgrade? How can re-development in catchments with existing under-performing stormwater infrastructure be managed to enable the in-ground works to progressively meet the government’s goals without expensive upgrade? Must the creeks and natural waterways on Sydney’s northern, western and southern perimeters be sacrificed to hard-lining in the wake of the proposed expansion? Positive answers to these and many other questions based on WSUD ‘source control’ practices will be provided in the Workshop.

The Workshop will also include results of hydrological modelling of high-performing filter-bioretention systems enhanced by treatment taking place in parent soil masses; the fate of dissolved pollutants is singled out for particular attention.

The short course includes: design procedures based on state-of-the-art analyses and best overseas practices adapted to Australia-wide conditions; case study illustrations drawn from field installations with between ten and 18 years of Australian operational history; design ‘worked examples’; introduction and access to rainwater tank sizing software applicable across Australia. The Workshop will be led by Professor John Argue.

Attendance at the Workshop earns 32 hours credit for continuing professional development purposes with Engineers Australia. More information about the workshop including course content, cost and Registration Forms may be obtained from Ms Ann Ellis on (03) 9326 9777 or ann@eeaust.com.au